Archive for the ‘Home Page’ Category

Building Beloved Community Leadership

Read about CBMA’s 2017 cohort of 24 fellows taking part in the Building Beloved Community Leadership initiative. This leadership development experience is customized for emerging leaders in the Black male achievement field. The fellows will participate in a year-long Building Beloved Community Leadership Fellowship learning community that will help ensure individual effectiveness and impact in organizational leadership within the broader field of Black male achievement. A three-day leadership gathering in Greensboro, North Carolina with the Center for Creative Leadership and the Beloved Community Center will serve as a catalyst for this twelve-month journey.

Healing Men of Color After A Violent Incident

Read this NPR post on Vera’s approach to help men of color heal after a violent incident. To reach as many young men of color as possible, Vera’s Center on Youth Justice is using an unusual corps of researchers: the young men themselves. The Institute is currently interviewing young men of color, age 18 to 24, from neighborhoods across the city to form an eight-man research team that will spend the next year conducting 150 interviews with other young men of color, age 18 to 24. The research team will even be involved in analyzing the data so the Vera Institute can publish the findings.

Long-Run Impacts of Same-Race Teachers

Read this latest report from IZA Institute of Labor Economics that shows how assigning a Black male to a Black teacher in third, fourth, or fifth grades significantly reduces the probability that he drops out of high school, particularly among the most economically disadvantaged Black males.

Retreat Is Opportunity to Tune In to Black Males

In this blog post, Jamal Watson writes about the National Black Male Retreat at Ohio State University, now in its 12th year, that provides a rare opportunity for Black male college students to convene each year. The retreat embodies much of what is missing from the national discourse on Black males. Not enough of our so-called “experts” on Black males are listening to what young Black males have to say.

11-Year-Old Promotes Books for Black Boys

Read about Sidney Keys III, an 11-year-old from St. Louis who launched his own reading club for boys called Books N Bros. For a monthly membership fee of $20, participants receive a book, worksheets and a snack during meetings. A Black male mentor meets with the boys at each meeting. Looking to the future, Sidney envisions a Books N Bros club in cities across the nation.

  • Posted in Posts
  • Tags:

NYS Education Dept Awards $6M in MBK Grants

The State Education Department (SED) awarded more than $6 million in grants to 42 school districts for the My Brother’s Keeper Family and Community Engagement Program. These grants will support programs to increase the academic achievement and college and career readiness of boys and young men of color while fostering the development of effective relationships with families to promote the success of all students.

  • Posted in Posts
  • Tags:

Mass Incarceration & Racial Achievement Gap

This Washington Post article highlights he findings from Economic Policy Institute’s report, Mass Incarceration and Children’s Outcomes: Criminal Justice Policy is Education Policy. The report says the “evidence is overwhelming that the unjustified incarceration of African American fathers (and, increasingly, mothers as well) is an important cause of the lowered performance of their children” and of the racial achievement gap.

Consider:

  • By the age of 14, approximately 25 percent of African American children have experienced a parent — in most cases a father — being imprisoned for some period of time. On any given school day, approximately 10 percent of African American schoolchildren have a parent who is in jail or prison, more than four times the share in 1980.
  • The comparable share for white children is 4 percent; an African American child is six times as likely as a white child to have or have had an incarcerated parent.
  • A growing share of African Americans have been arrested for drug crimes, yet African Americans are no more likely than whites to sell or use drugs. Of imprisoned fathers of African American children, only one-third are in prison because of a violent crime.
  • Research in criminal justice, health, sociology, epidemiology, and economics demonstrates that when parents are incarcerated, children do worse across cognitive and noncognitive outcome measures — and the incarceration is a key cause. For example, children of incarcerated parents are more likely to drop out of school; develop learning disabilities; misbehave in school; suffer from migraines, asthma, high cholesterol, depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder and homelessness.

Google Pledges $11.5M to Fight Racial Bias

Read this USA Today article to learn about Google’s $11.5 million pledge to organization combating racial disparities in the criminal justice system, double what it has given so far. And, in keeping with a company built on information, the latest wave of grants target organizations that crunch data to pinpoint problems and propose solutions.

  • Posted in Posts
  • Tags:

Weingart Foundation Fully Commits to Equity

Dr. Robert K. Ross, CEO of The California Endowment, writes in this Huffington Post article about equity: Weingart Foundation’s commitment to equity, a full-day conversation about equity in American by philanthropy and private foundations in LA, and the greater battle against inequality in that nation.

  • Posted in Posts
  • Tags:

CBMA & Skillman’s Innovation Challenge

In effort to address the lack of inclusion in Detroit, the Skillman Foundation and Campaign for Black Male Achievement, launched the My Brother’s Keeper Detroit Innovation Challenge. This $500,000 initiative invests in programs that seek to empower Detroit’s young men of color.

The six projects awarded were:

  • Culture Creators: Helps young men become leaders, community builders and independent artists by merging arts, activism and entrepreneurship.
  • Developing Despite Distance: Helps young men of color express complex emotions and connect with their incarcerated parents.
  • Dream Deferred Project: Works with young adults who have left school and the workplace, reconnecting them in educational and economic opportunities.
  • Giving Them The Business: Teaches young men of color practical skills to become owners and operators of restaurants using a full-service restaurant setting.
  • JOURNi: Addresses the lack of opportunities for Detroit youth to develop tech and entrepreneurial skills.
  • Our Town: offers neighborhood and city tours designed and lead by youth from Detroit’s east side.

Learn more here.