Archive for the ‘Home Page’ Category

The Power and Dignity of Black Men

“Seeing people who look like you do positive things can have a profound impact on how you see yourself.” This is the foundation for Black Male Re-Imagined, a narrative photo project by TIME’s “Instagram Photographer of 2016″ Ruddy Roye.

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Foundations & Social Justice

Philanthropy needs to become more diverse and fund the fight for political change, argues Dr. Andre Perry in “Foundations Aren’t Helping Anyone if They’re Not Serious About Social Justice,” published by The Hechinger Report. He adds, “We are not going to ‘nonprofit’ our way to educational justice.”

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Grantmaking Habits That Prevent Equity

This blog by the Bay Area Justice Funders Network addresses grantmaking habits that reinforce inequities and the intentional practices based on social justice values that can replace those habits.

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“America Divided”: Putting a Spotlight on Inequality

Explore Ford Foundation’s recaps of “America Divided,” a docu-series featuring narratives around inequality in education, housing, healthcare, labor, criminal justice, and the political system. The recaps highlight resources and insights on the important policy and social justice issues raised in each episode.

Flint’s Problems Beyond Water Quality

In this PND article, President of the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, Ridgway White, writes on the problems that still face Flint: residents’ health, the city’s infrastructure, the local economy, and public trust. The foundation, headquartered in Flint, has committed up to $100 million to help the community respond.

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No Justice Without Economic Justice

In this blog, Ben Hecht, president and CEO of Living Cities, writes about the legacy of Martin Luther King Jr. not only in racial justice, but also economic justice. Hecht sees much more work to be done, with the wealth gap wider now than in King’s day.

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$2.1M From Fund for Girls & Young Women of Color

The NYC Fund for Girls and Young Women of Color has announced 2016 grants totaling $2.1 million in support of efforts to cultivate the leadership of young women of color as agents of structural change.

Launched by the New York Women’s Foundation and NoVo Foundation in 2014, the funder collaborative supports efforts aimed at fostering sustained structural change that disrupts generational cycles of poverty, abuse, and disinvestment and transforms the lives of young women of color.

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JPMorgan Chase, $20M for Youth Career Education

The Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) and JPMorgan Chase & Co. today announced $20 million in grants to 10 U.S. states to dramatically increase the number of students who graduate from high school prepared for careers. Delaware, Kentucky, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Nevada, Ohio, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, Tennessee and Wisconsin will each receive $2 million over three years to expand and improve career pathways for all high school students.

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“MLK Now 2017″ Recording

Watch the “MLK Now 2017,” presented by CBMA and Blackout for Human Rights, livestream from January 16.

“MLK Now 2017” comse at an especially critical point, as people across the country prepare for the new President to take office. In addition to the performances, “MLK Now” features conversations with national and community activists, organizers and thought leaders including Million Hoodies Executive Director Dante Barry and Chicago Youth Peace Activist FM Supreme to address how issues of racial, social and economic justice will be impacted by the incoming Administration, and how to ensure the strength and sustainability of progressive movement-building going forward.

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Shifting Philanthropy from Charity to Justice

This SSIR article encourages philanthropists who champion equality to shift from a framework that grounds giving in “charity” to “justice.” Giving should seek to break down longstanding, intentional, institutional policies that have shaped social divides in the United States and that continue to promote inequality today.

It provides seven questions that every philanthropist should consider about the inputs and outputs of their efforts