Posts Tagged ‘Blog’

Work of My Brother’s Keeper Continues

Read Broderick Johnson’s LinkedIn post regarding the work that former President Obama’s My Brother Keeper initiative has done and continues to do.

“Established in February 2014, MBK grew out of an understanding that the disparities that separate young people of color from their white peers, in terms of performance and success, stem substantially from huge gaps in resources and opportunity. Gaps that begin in life’s earliest days and continue through childhood and into early adulthood. It was President Obama’s firm determination that government (federal and local) and the private sector could do much better. And that fundamentally what was needed was greater vision and rigor, more resources, and more targeted collaboration”

Prioritize Wellness to Close Racial Health Gap

Read this PND blog post by Shawn Dove and Dr. Phyllis Hubbard, CBMA’s CEO and director of CBMA’s Health and Healing Strategies, respectively, on why philanthropy plays a critical role in “promoting healthy behaviors and strengthening the wellness of leaders and caregivers, so that they, in turn, can create healthier environments for the young people of color they serve.”

“At the same time, leaders in philanthropy and the BMA field must look in the mirror and ask themselves how they can set an example by integrating health, wellness, and self-care into their collective and organizational ethos and culture. Only by embodying the type of leadership we want others to exhibit will we successfully create the transformative change needed to close America’s racial health gap.”

Looking Forward, In Gratitude

Rashid Shabazz announced in this blog post that he will leave his position as VP of Communications at the Campaign for Black Male Achievement (CBMA) to serve as the inaugural Chief Marketing and Storytelling Officer at Color of Change.

In his tenure at CBMA, Rashid helped launch programs, including BMAfunders and the Echoing Green Black Male Achievement fellowship. He had a role in helping to seed the Executives’ Alliance for Boys and Men of Color and to develop what would become Obama’s My Brother’s Keeper initiative. And he prioritized creating new narratives for Black men and boys that focused on assets.

Philanthropy Must Use Its Voice and Resources

Emmett D. Carson, CEO and President of the Silicon Valley Community Foundation, writes:

“Philanthropy must use its voice and financial resources to engage in research, advocacy, and lobbying (community foundations) to eliminate the systemic racism and other bias that permeates our policing and criminal justice, housing, healthcare, employment, voting rights and education systems, resulting in unfair outcomes.”

Embrace Racial Healing

Read this Philanthropy News Digest blog post from the president and CEO of the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, La June Montgomery Tabron.

“Racial healing doesn’t begin until you intentionally, respectfully, and patiently uncover shared truths,” she writes.

Prevent Foundations from Deepening Racism

Read Trabian Shorters’  analysis of the warped mentality many progressive foundations have when considering their work in black communities. Shorters argues that the combative War on Poverty narrative that “casts black children in the role of threat” and turns the “urban schools, homes, and cities in which they dwell” into battlefields helps cement racism, rather than fight it. He urges philanthropists to craft a new narrative by highlighting positive statistics and discussing the successes of black Americans in areas such as parenting, patriotism, enterprise, and generosity. He includes other tips for nonprofit leaders, including depositing money in black owned banks and working with consulting firms that have people of color in their senior leadership.

What Does Advocacy Look Like Today?

Dive in to key tips that the Urgent Action Fund (UAF) has identified for its frontline activists hoping to do effective organizing in the “different environment” that has emerged in the U.S. over the last six months. UAF has found that progressive agendas depend on grassroots mobilization, supporting intersectional activism is crucial, and working with international actors can be key to progress in the United States.

Escaping the Mold: An Exchange on Manhood

Follow the deep and eye-opening email exchange between Dwight Vidale (founder of the Young Men of Color Symposium) and Dorian O. Burton (executive director of the Kenan Charitable Trust) as they discuss black masculinity, vulnerability, and self-love. As Dorian writes: “you are my brother and man to man I offer my ears to listen, my hands to do the work of our communities, and most importantly I offer my shoulder to cry on, because the sooner we realize boys do cry and they have a village willing to listen, work, and dry their tears, the quicker we will truly step into our masculinity and the men we have been destined to be.”

Retreat Is Opportunity to Tune In to Black Males

In this blog post, Jamal Watson writes about the National Black Male Retreat at Ohio State University, now in its 12th year, that provides a rare opportunity for Black male college students to convene each year. The retreat embodies much of what is missing from the national discourse on Black males. Not enough of our so-called “experts” on Black males are listening to what young Black males have to say.

Weingart Foundation Fully Commits to Equity

Dr. Robert K. Ross, CEO of The California Endowment, writes in this Huffington Post article about equity: Weingart Foundation’s commitment to equity, a full-day conversation about equity in American by philanthropy and private foundations in LA, and the greater battle against inequality in that nation.