Posts Tagged ‘News’

$2.1M From Fund for Girls & Young Women of Color

The NYC Fund for Girls and Young Women of Color has announced 2016 grants totaling $2.1 million in support of efforts to cultivate the leadership of young women of color as agents of structural change.

Launched by the New York Women’s Foundation and NoVo Foundation in 2014, the funder collaborative supports efforts aimed at fostering sustained structural change that disrupts generational cycles of poverty, abuse, and disinvestment and transforms the lives of young women of color.

JPMorgan Chase, $20M for Youth Career Education

The Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO) and JPMorgan Chase & Co. today announced $20 million in grants to 10 U.S. states to dramatically increase the number of students who graduate from high school prepared for careers. Delaware, Kentucky, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Nevada, Ohio, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, Tennessee and Wisconsin will each receive $2 million over three years to expand and improve career pathways for all high school students.

CalEndow Protects Safety Net Programs in CA

The California Endowment has announced a three-year, $25 million effort to protect the health, safety, and wellness of all Californians. In partnership with local and state agencies, the endowment’s Fight4All initiative will invest primarily in grantees of the foundation’s Building Healthy Communities initiative. And to cover the costs of the new program, the endowment will reallocate some of the funds it had planned to award to nonprofits working to implement Obamacare.

OSF Initiative, Communities Against Hate

Open Society Foundations aims to support, protect, and empower those who are targets of hateful acts and rhetoric. Communities Against Hate is designed to bolster communities’ ability to resist the spread of hate and strengthen protections for their most vulnerable neighbors.

Learn most about Communities Against Hate, project eligibility criteria, and guidelines here.

Talking About Successful Black & Latino Boys

Read this LA Times article by Sonali Kohli about a UCLA report on why it’s important to talk about successful Black and Latino boys.

Researchers asked faculty at six Los Angeles County high schools to identify boys in grades 10 through 12 who either excelled academically, held leadership roles in extracurricular activities or showed resilience in their home lives. They interviewed those boys and asked them how they defined success, and what they felt had contributed to theirs. The new report highlights how high expectations at home, safe places such as community organizations and sports programs, and strong mentors at school motivate students who thrive.

Boys and Men of Color Executive Director Collaboration Circle

Fourteen local leaders have been selected for a new six-month pilot program to help build the capacity of nonprofits working on behalf of boys and men of color in several counties across Georgia — including Clayton, Cobb, DeKalb, Fulton, Gwinnett and Rockdale.

Participants include:

The Boys and Men of Color Executive Director Collaboration Circle is a joint effort by the Casey Foundation and Foundation Center South to help local leaders build partnerships, network and secure additional funding to develop educational and economic opportunities for this historically challenged population.

“We need to move from identifying the challenges boys and men of color face, to cultivating leaders who are willing to step up and address them,” said Kweku Forstall, who leads Casey’s work in Atlanta. “We hope the Circle will be an avenue for participants to evaluate promising approaches and advocate for much needed changes to the public policies and systems that have kept us from investing in boys and men of color as the assets they are — here in Georgia, and across the nation.”

Casey’s Changing the Odds report highlights many of the barriers boys and men of color face and the root causes in Atlanta, including:

  • a history of segregation in public housing and zoning;
  • under-resourced schools and poor learning environments; and
  • the unequal distribution of jobs and career opportunities.

“Nonprofits supporting boys and men of color often tackle these complex barriers with tight budgets, small teams and limited opportunities for staff to learn, grow and regroup from the many demands that are common to the field,” said Utoia Gabby Wooten from the Foundation Center. “However, we are optimistic that with the right supports behind them, these leaders will breathe new life into Atlanta and help more boys and men of color navigate through life successfully.”

The executive leaders will meet monthly for interactive work sessions to develop strategies for engaging the philanthropic sector and generating revenue, and to create collaborative, community-based programming to close the persistent racial and equity gaps that exist in Atlanta.

The participants will also get the chance to present their collaborative projects to potential funders and compete for a grant of at least $25,000 to pilot their concept beginning in fall 2017.

For more information, contact Gabby Wooten.

Divesting From Industries Harming People of Color

The Brooklyn Community Foundation announced that, in alignment with its commitment to advancing racial equity, it will formally divest from private prisons, gun manufacturers, and predatory lenders.

 

California Foundations Commit $1.3 Million

Seven California foundations committed more than $1.3 million to an initiative that aims to improve public safety by building trust between law enforcement and communities of color. Participants in the funding effort include The California Endowment, The California Wellness Foundation, The James Irvine Foundation, Rosenberg Foundation, San Francisco Foundation, Weingart Foundation, and the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. The funds will expand the Building Trust Through Reform initiative led by PICO California, a statewide network of 500 faith-based community organizations.

Philly Re-establishes Commission for AA Males

Philadelphia Mayor Jim Kenney and other city officials re-established a commission that focuses on issues facing black men in the city, the Mayor’s Commission of African American Males (MCAAM). The group will regularly provide recommendations to the city for improvement. Kenney appointed 28 members to the commission, which include government officials, business people, educators and civic leaders.

More information available here.

RWJF’s $12M to Forward Promise & 7 Issue Briefs

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation announces its $12 million commitment to Forward Promise, an initiative to improve the prospects of boys and young men of color, and commissions seven issue briefs that examine key barriers to health and success for young men of color, as well as promising practices. With this information, the Foundation hopes to engage schools, communities, and governments in a national dialogue on how to turn around the disturbing trends for boys and young men of color.