Posts Tagged ‘Research’

Racial discrimination varies by education level, gender

“A majority of black adults say they have been discriminated against because of their race, but this varies by education.”

A Fact Tank article by Monica Anderson highlights discrimination patterns found in a new Pew Research Center survey as it relates to race, gender, and education level.

“Roughly eight-in-ten blacks with at least some college experience (81%) say they’ve experienced racial discrimination, at least from time to time, including 17% who say this happens regularly. Among blacks with a high school education or less, these shares are lower – 69% and 9%, respectively.”

Black and Hispanic Male Educational Attainment

“Black and Hispanic males who earn a bachelor’s degree or higher hold an employment-population ratio of 77.3 percent and 83.7 percent, respectively. Of those who only have a high school diploma and no college, Black males had an employment-population ratio of 59.7 percent, while Hispanic males had a ratio of 78.2 percent.”

An article by Tiffany Pennamon in Diverse Issues in Higher Education highlights research on Black and Hispanic male educational attainment. New data from the Charles H. Houston Center for the Study of the Black Experience in Education at Clemson University indicates African-American and Hispanic males’ employment attainment can be improved if educators and policymakers implement “practices and policies that drive the underrepresented group’s educational persistence and completion”. The center released an infographic revealing some key research findings.

New Report on ‘Economic Success for Black Men’

Read the new report published by the American Enterprise Institute exploring the factors behind economic progress made by black men in America over the last 50 years.

“The public conversation about race in America, and the fortunes of black men in particular, has been sobering of late, and for reasons that are all too understandable. But there are also reasons for hope and models of success worth dwelling upon when it comes to thinking about race in America. In particular, in examining the economic fortunes of American black men, we and that almost one-in-two have made it to the middle class or higher by midlife.”

Inheritance of Black Poverty: It’s All About the Men

This Brookings article argues that “Breaking the cycle of intergenerational poverty for black Americans requires a transformation in the economic outcomes for black men, particularly in terms of earnings.”

“Black Americans born poor are much less likely to move up the income ladder than those in other racial groups, especially whites. Why? Many factors are at work, including educational inequalities, neighborhood effects, workplace discrimination, parenting, access to credit, rates of incarceration, and so on.”

Black & White Income Gap Persists Despite Similiar Education & Family Income

Read this NYTimes article that finds that “Black boys raised in America, even in the wealthiest families and living in some of the most well-to-do neighborhoods, still earn less in adulthood than white boys with similar backgrounds, according to a sweeping new study that traced the lives of millions of children.”

Get Out! Black Male Suspensions in California

Read this report by Black Minds Project that finds that although the Black male student suspension rate decreased 5 percent between 2011-12, racial disparities still remain.

Quantifying Hope, 2017

We’re thrilled to announce the release of the 2017 edition of Quantifying Hope: Philanthropic Support for Black Men and Boys.

Amidst current racial tensions in the United States and the ever-shifting social and political landscape, the report analyzes foundation funding explicitly targeted to improve the life outcomes of Black men and boys. The report also examines strategies and milestones in the field of Black male achievement and how philanthropy can build on this work for stronger coordination and greater impact.

This report is jointly produced by the Campaign for Black Male Achievement and Foundation Center.

Beyond Plight, Pathways to Optimal Development

Read ABFE’s latest report, Beyond Plight: Defining Pathways to Optimal Development for Black Men and Boys across the Life Course.

The observations and recommendations within Beyond Plight were based upon input from funders and practitioners who have invested resources and brain power into better outcomes for Black men and boys – some for their entire professional careers.

Black Men Inspiring Hope

Follow coverage of a John Hopkins University study released in March that showed “low-income black students randomly assigned to at least one black teacher are more likely to graduate from high school and aspire to college. The researchers tracked through high school all 100,000 students who entered 3rd grade in North Carolina between 2001 and 2005. The results were especially profound in the early years: Having just one black teacher during grades 3-5 increases ‘persistently low-income’ black boys’ interest in pursuing college by 29 percent and decreases their chance of dropping out of high school by 39 percent.” This article highlights the inspirational work of Stephen Flemming, a black male teacher adored by his students.

Culturally Responsive Evaluations for BMOC

Read RISE for Boys and Men of Color’s publication, Advancing Culturally Responsive Evaluations for Boys and Men of Color. While BMOCs are the targets of many social programs and interventions, a dearth of high-quality culturally responsive evaluations exist on the effectiveness of various gender- and population-specific approaches for BMOCs to achieve measurable results.