Posts Tagged ‘Research’

Get Out! Black Male Suspensions in California

Read this report by Black Minds Project that finds that although the Black male student suspension rate decreased 5 percent between 2011-12, racial disparities still remain.

Quantifying Hope, 2017

We’re thrilled to announce the release of the 2017 edition of Quantifying Hope: Philanthropic Support for Black Men and Boys.

Amidst current racial tensions in the United States and the ever-shifting social and political landscape, the report analyzes foundation funding explicitly targeted to improve the life outcomes of Black men and boys. The report also examines strategies and milestones in the field of Black male achievement and how philanthropy can build on this work for stronger coordination and greater impact.

This report is jointly produced by the Campaign for Black Male Achievement and Foundation Center.

Beyond Plight, Pathways to Optimal Development

Read ABFE’s latest report, Beyond Plight: Defining Pathways to Optimal Development for Black Men and Boys across the Life Course.

The observations and recommendations within Beyond Plight were based upon input from funders and practitioners who have invested resources and brain power into better outcomes for Black men and boys – some for their entire professional careers.

Black Men Inspiring Hope

Follow coverage of a John Hopkins University study released in March that showed “low-income black students randomly assigned to at least one black teacher are more likely to graduate from high school and aspire to college. The researchers tracked through high school all 100,000 students who entered 3rd grade in North Carolina between 2001 and 2005. The results were especially profound in the early years: Having just one black teacher during grades 3-5 increases ‘persistently low-income’ black boys’ interest in pursuing college by 29 percent and decreases their chance of dropping out of high school by 39 percent.” This article highlights the inspirational work of Stephen Flemming, a black male teacher adored by his students.

Culturally Responsive Evaluations for BMOC

Read RISE for Boys and Men of Color’s publication, Advancing Culturally Responsive Evaluations for Boys and Men of Color. While BMOCs are the targets of many social programs and interventions, a dearth of high-quality culturally responsive evaluations exist on the effectiveness of various gender- and population-specific approaches for BMOCs to achieve measurable results.

Addressing Trauma Among GBQ Boys of Color

Read this research brief on how race and ethnicity contribute to negative outcomes for LGBTQ youth of color – particularly for gay, bisexual, and queer (GBQ) boys and young men of color. The brief attempts to highlight the research that has been conducted on this topic, as well as the research gaps that remain.

Healing Men of Color After a Violent Incident

Read this NPR post on Vera’s approach to help men of color heal after a violent incident. To reach as many young men of color as possible, Vera’s Center on Youth Justice is using an unusual corps of researchers: the young men themselves. The Institute is currently interviewing young men of color, age 18 to 24, from neighborhoods across the city to form an eight-man research team that will spend the next year conducting 150 interviews with other young men of color, age 18 to 24. The research team will even be involved in analyzing the data so the Vera Institute can publish the findings.

Long-Run Impacts of Same-Race Teachers

Read this latest report from IZA Institute of Labor Economics that shows how assigning a Black male to a Black teacher in third, fourth, or fifth grades significantly reduces the probability that he drops out of high school, particularly among the most economically disadvantaged Black males.

Mass Incarceration & Racial Achievement Gap

This Washington Post article highlights he findings from Economic Policy Institute’s report, Mass Incarceration and Children’s Outcomes: Criminal Justice Policy is Education Policy. The report says the “evidence is overwhelming that the unjustified incarceration of African American fathers (and, increasingly, mothers as well) is an important cause of the lowered performance of their children” and of the racial achievement gap.


  • By the age of 14, approximately 25 percent of African American children have experienced a parent — in most cases a father — being imprisoned for some period of time. On any given school day, approximately 10 percent of African American schoolchildren have a parent who is in jail or prison, more than four times the share in 1980.
  • The comparable share for white children is 4 percent; an African American child is six times as likely as a white child to have or have had an incarcerated parent.
  • A growing share of African Americans have been arrested for drug crimes, yet African Americans are no more likely than whites to sell or use drugs. Of imprisoned fathers of African American children, only one-third are in prison because of a violent crime.
  • Research in criminal justice, health, sociology, epidemiology, and economics demonstrates that when parents are incarcerated, children do worse across cognitive and noncognitive outcome measures — and the incarceration is a key cause. For example, children of incarcerated parents are more likely to drop out of school; develop learning disabilities; misbehave in school; suffer from migraines, asthma, high cholesterol, depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder and homelessness.

Advocacy Funder Collaboratives

For many foundations, collaboration is key to advocating for policy and practice change. But these kinds of partnerships can be challenging to execute well. “Sticking points,” like conflicts over decision-making power or competition for resources, can derail advocacy-focused efforts and make even the most earnest collaborator wary.

Foundation Center, in partnership with the Atlas Learning Project, recently launched a suite of resources about advocacy funder collaboratives. Built from the wisdom of grantmakers with deep experience in these kinds of collaboratives, the GrantCraft content and IssueLab special collection examine what makes an effective advocacy collaborative and offer ways to overcome sticking points to maximize the potential for success.

The GrantCraft series consists of bite-sized articles based on interviews with experienced funders and includes topics like “What Are the Benefits of Being Part of an Advocacy Collaborative” and “Sticking Points: Personality Conflicts.” IssueLab’s special collection brings together 40+ reports and reflection pieces about multi-party advocacy efforts.