Posts Tagged ‘Research’

Healing Men of Color After A Violent Incident

Read this NPR post on Vera’s approach to help men of color heal after a violent incident. To reach as many young men of color as possible, Vera’s Center on Youth Justice is using an unusual corps of researchers: the young men themselves. The Institute is currently interviewing young men of color, age 18 to 24, from neighborhoods across the city to form an eight-man research team that will spend the next year conducting 150 interviews with other young men of color, age 18 to 24. The research team will even be involved in analyzing the data so the Vera Institute can publish the findings.

Long-Run Impacts of Same-Race Teachers

Read this latest report from IZA Institute of Labor Economics that shows how assigning a Black male to a Black teacher in third, fourth, or fifth grades significantly reduces the probability that he drops out of high school, particularly among the most economically disadvantaged Black males.

Mass Incarceration & Racial Achievement Gap

This Washington Post article highlights he findings from Economic Policy Institute’s report, Mass Incarceration and Children’s Outcomes: Criminal Justice Policy is Education Policy. The report says the “evidence is overwhelming that the unjustified incarceration of African American fathers (and, increasingly, mothers as well) is an important cause of the lowered performance of their children” and of the racial achievement gap.

Consider:

  • By the age of 14, approximately 25 percent of African American children have experienced a parent — in most cases a father — being imprisoned for some period of time. On any given school day, approximately 10 percent of African American schoolchildren have a parent who is in jail or prison, more than four times the share in 1980.
  • The comparable share for white children is 4 percent; an African American child is six times as likely as a white child to have or have had an incarcerated parent.
  • A growing share of African Americans have been arrested for drug crimes, yet African Americans are no more likely than whites to sell or use drugs. Of imprisoned fathers of African American children, only one-third are in prison because of a violent crime.
  • Research in criminal justice, health, sociology, epidemiology, and economics demonstrates that when parents are incarcerated, children do worse across cognitive and noncognitive outcome measures — and the incarceration is a key cause. For example, children of incarcerated parents are more likely to drop out of school; develop learning disabilities; misbehave in school; suffer from migraines, asthma, high cholesterol, depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder and homelessness.

Advocacy Funder Collaboratives

For many foundations, collaboration is key to advocating for policy and practice change. But these kinds of partnerships can be challenging to execute well. “Sticking points,” like conflicts over decision-making power or competition for resources, can derail advocacy-focused efforts and make even the most earnest collaborator wary.

Foundation Center, in partnership with the Atlas Learning Project, recently launched a suite of resources about advocacy funder collaboratives. Built from the wisdom of grantmakers with deep experience in these kinds of collaboratives, the GrantCraft content and IssueLab special collection examine what makes an effective advocacy collaborative and offer ways to overcome sticking points to maximize the potential for success.

The GrantCraft series consists of bite-sized articles based on interviews with experienced funders and includes topics like “What Are the Benefits of Being Part of an Advocacy Collaborative” and “Sticking Points: Personality Conflicts.” IssueLab’s special collection brings together 40+ reports and reflection pieces about multi-party advocacy efforts.

The Future of African-American Philanthropy

Read Gasby Brown’s PND blog post on findings from the 2016 U.S. Trust® Study of High Net Worth Philanthropy.

As the demography of America changes, the face of philanthropy is changing along with it. While African Americans have a tradition of giving, the report highlights new data on African-American donors that gives us a clearer picture of the future of philanthropy in the U.S.

 

Talking About Successful Black & Latino Boys

Read this LA Times article by Sonali Kohli about a UCLA report on why it’s important to talk about successful Black and Latino boys.

Researchers asked faculty at six Los Angeles County high schools to identify boys in grades 10 through 12 who either excelled academically, held leadership roles in extracurricular activities or showed resilience in their home lives. They interviewed those boys and asked them how they defined success, and what they felt had contributed to theirs. The new report highlights how high expectations at home, safe places such as community organizations and sports programs, and strong mentors at school motivate students who thrive.

Pennies for Progress, NCRP’s Latest Report

NCRP finds in its latest report, Pennies for Progress: A Decade of Boom For Philanthropy, A Bust For Social Justice, that while total foundation assets grew by 70 percent between 2003 and 2013, which includes the Great Recession, marginalized communities saw little of these dollars. The share of all domestic funding for social justice strategies remained stagnant at 10 percent for these 11 years.

Annenberg Institute for Educational Equity

Read the research done by the Annenberg Institute for School Reform (AISR) and the Center for Collaborative Education on opportunities and achievements for different groups of students across Boston Public Schools. Unsurprising, they found that Black and Latino males experience systemic gaps in opportunity. The team went on to examine the practices that create or reduce opportunity gaps; developed indicators to help school communities measure their progress and supported various stakeholders in their efforts to take action.

New Orleans: Who’s in Jail and Why?

Read the Vera Institute of Justice’s report, New Orleans: Who’s in Jail and Why? It aims to advance an important public conversation about how we are using out jail and how it impacts safety in our city.

Until recently, New Orleans led the nation in jail incarceration: before Katrina, we jailed people at a rate five times the national average. The consequences were dramatic for the tens of thousands of people booked into the jail each year who lost their jobs, homes, and even custody of their children. Instead of making us the safest city in America, this over-use of detention destabilized communities.

 

Documenting Racial Disparities in Police Force

In the shadow of the tragedies of Philando Castile, Alton Sterling, and law enforcement officers in Dallas, the National Justice Database released two major reports in collaboration with the Urban Institute and supported in part by the Open Society Foundations. OSF discusses these reports and race and policing in the country in their post here.

The first report, The Science of Justice: City Report, provides data analysis and recommendations based on the stop, force, policy, and climate survey data furnished by multiple departments around the country, summarizes indicators and potential causes of racial disparities, and compares a sample city’s department to others participating in the NJD. The second report, a comparative study entitled The Science of Justice: Race, Arrests, and Police Use of Force, examines use of force across 12 departments participating in the NJD, benchmarking on arrest rates in order to provide a conservative test of racial bias in police use of force.