Posts Tagged ‘Research’

Annenberg Institute for Educational Equity

Read the research done by the Annenberg Institute for School Reform (AISR) and the Center for Collaborative Education on opportunities and achievements for different groups of students across Boston Public Schools. Unsurprising, they found that Black and Latino males experience systemic gaps in opportunity. The team went on to examine the practices that create or reduce opportunity gaps; developed indicators to help school communities measure their progress and supported various stakeholders in their efforts to take action.

New Orleans: Who’s in Jail and Why?

Read the Vera Institute of Justice’s report, New Orleans: Who’s in Jail and Why? It aims to advance an important public conversation about how we are using out jail and how it impacts safety in our city.

Until recently, New Orleans led the nation in jail incarceration: before Katrina, we jailed people at a rate five times the national average. The consequences were dramatic for the tens of thousands of people booked into the jail each year who lost their jobs, homes, and even custody of their children. Instead of making us the safest city in America, this over-use of detention destabilized communities.

 

Documenting Racial Disparities in Police Force

In the shadow of the tragedies of Philando Castile, Alton Sterling, and law enforcement officers in Dallas, the National Justice Database released two major reports in collaboration with the Urban Institute and supported in part by the Open Society Foundations. OSF discusses these reports and race and policing in the country in their post here.

The first report, The Science of Justice: City Report, provides data analysis and recommendations based on the stop, force, policy, and climate survey data furnished by multiple departments around the country, summarizes indicators and potential causes of racial disparities, and compares a sample city’s department to others participating in the NJD. The second report, a comparative study entitled The Science of Justice: Race, Arrests, and Police Use of Force, examines use of force across 12 departments participating in the NJD, benchmarking on arrest rates in order to provide a conservative test of racial bias in police use of force.

IssueLab’s Race and Policing Special Collection

IssueLab’s new special collection on Race and Policing includes research from nonprofits, foundations, and university-based research centers across the U.S., who are taking a closer look at evidence about racial bias in stop-and-frisk policies, traffic stops, and the use of force, as well as at data about differing perceptions of policing.

The collection also includes recommendations for addressing this chronic and tragic problem, including: how to restore trust between police and the community, the efficacy of body cameras, and the need for more accurate and comparable data that can be used to hold police departments to account.

Again and again the data show that people of color in the U.S. are disproportionately, and systematically, stopped, frisked, arrested, and exposed to the use of force by police. Police departments and communities across the U.S. are struggling with these realities and with what has become a glaring divide in how Americans experience and relate to policing.

A Tale of Two Zip Codes, California Endowment

What determines how long we live? The surprising thing to us was that adjacent communities can have a 15 year-difference in life expectancy. Your preconditioned brains might attribute this to dramatic factors like drugs and violence (ours did). But the causes are actually more sinister: heart disease, obesity, and diabetes, all of which can be linked to Chronic Stress and stem directly from economic inequality. So we are all implicated… and we hope you learn as much from this 4-minute video as we did in the 15 years it took us to make it.

Heard, Not Judged: Insights Into Young Men of Color

MEE Productions’ newest report, Heard, Not Judged: Insights into the Talents, Realities and Needs of Young Men of Color, delves into the everyday life, concerns, and obstacles facing boys and men of color.

It provides detailed findings about what boys and young men of color need in order to help them overcome the challenges and obstacles they face in their day-to-day lives.  The report highlights the voices of young men in Oakland, New York City, Baltimore, Atlanta, New Orleans, and Detroit as they opened up and shared what is on their minds and in their hearts. Among other things, the report focuses on four main areas:

  • Values: This section explores the personal values of low-income, urban African-American males and the obstacles they face (real or perceived).
  • Success and Optimal Health: This section aims to understand how African-American males define success, optimal health (physical, emotional, mental, etc.), and understand what they need in order to thrive, rather than merely survive.
  • Competition/Winning/Skills and Creative Talents: This section aims to understand how African-American males define and value competition. They talked about their personal talents and abilities and how those helped them compete in life.
  • Existing Resources for African-American Males: African-American males discussed the quantity and quality of resources available to them, both via online/digital tools and in their respective home communities.

 

NYC Disparity Report

The Disparity Report, commissioned by the New York City Young Men’s Initiative and developed by the Center for Innovation through Data Intelligence, provides a snapshot of where New York City’s young people of color stand in relation to their peers in the areas of education, economic security and mobility, health and wellbeing, and community and personal safety. The analysis, which disaggregates data by race and gender, found that while there have been decreases in several disparities for young men and women of color, disparities persist.

CDC Report: Mental Health Treatment

Read “Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Men’s Use of Mental Health Treatments,” a report by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Key findings include:

  • Nearly 9% of men (8.5%) had daily feelings of anxiety or depression. Less than one-half of them (41.0%) took medication for these feelings or had recently talked to a mental health professional.
  • Among men aged 18–44, non-Hispanic black and Hispanic men (6.1%) were less likely than non-Hispanic white men (8.5%) to report daily feelings of anxiety or depression.
  • Among men aged 18–44 who had daily feelings of anxiety or depression, non-Hispanic black and Hispanic men (26.4%) were less likely than non-Hispanic white men (45.4%) to have used mental health treatments.
  • Among men aged 18–44, racial and ethnic differences in the use of mental health treatments were significantly greater for men without health insurance coverage than for men with health insurance.

Changing Course

See key findings from a report published by the Center for the Study of Social Policy, Changing Course: Improving Outcomes for African-American Males Involved With Child Welfare Systems. This paper draws attention to African-American boys and young men who are involved with the nation’s child welfare systems and identifies policies and practices that can help to improve their experiences and outcomes.